Planting for bees and other pollinators

Our bees, butterflies, moths and other vital pollinating insects are diminishing fast. If something isn't done this will have an impact on food prouction.

No_avatar_small Submitted by Janet Rhodes
Make:Shift
How can we use people, and local assets to make Wolverhampton a better place?

Our bees, butterflies, moths and other vital pollinating insects are diminishing fast (2012 being the worst year ever) due to: loss of habitat; pollution; use of herbicides and pesticides and global warming. If something isn't done this will have an impact on food prouction. If pollinators disappear altogether the human race would more than likely become extinct after 4 years. However, there is a solution. UK councils spend millions of pounds maintaining communal grassed areas on estates, in parks, on verges and in beds. Expensive classical displays of geraniums and bergonias, which are not attractive to pollinators, since they contain little nectar, are thrown away at the end of each season. What a waste! To save our pollinators and save our food, we need to persuade Wolverhampton City Council to sow perennial nil maintenance wild, colourful meadow flowers (attractive and full of nectar to our pollinators) in all communal areas including waste ground. This would save Wolverhampton substantial amounts of money. In the UK similar schemes have already been rolled out in Leeds, Liverpool, the Olympic Park, Birmingham and London. The result is a mass introduction of colour that has attracted numerous species of bees, hoverflies, beetles, butterflies, moths, saw flies etc. It has proved very popular with the public and has brought communities together. In Liverpool it has reduced anti-social behaviour due to enhancing the environment. It has also attracted tourists. Wolverhampton has a reutation for being full of derelict buildings, empty shops and colourless drab streets. We need to turn this around and my idea is one way of doing this whilst benefiting the environment